SIGN UP NOW for our 6-Week Online Weight Loss Program starting 2 May 2017 (sorry, we’re fully booked)

Registered dietitians, Bridget Surtees and Tamzyn Murphy, will guide you every step of the way using a whole-food, real food approach, which is naturally lower in carbohydrate and higher fat.

 

The 6 week program includes:

  • Before and after individualised health and diet assessment
  • Guided goal setting
  • Weekly individualised meal plan and shopping list
  • Weekly talk by Tamzyn or Bridget
  • Weekly HOTSEAT access to Bridget and Tamzyn for answers to all of your questions
  • Weekly reading/watching/listening material to guide you on your weight loss journey
  • Meal tracker dietary analysis and feedback
  • Body composition, dietary and accountability check-ins
  • Facebook support from others on the program

 

Lose weight and get the support you need to succeed, from the comfort of your home.

 

Cost: R 875

Starts: 2 May 2017

 

For more information or to sign up email info@realfooddietitians.co.za

Side effects of low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF) eating

By Tamzyn Murphy Campbell

BSc, BSc Med(Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics, RD

 

Many people experience certain common side effects when following low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF). These include:

  1. Keto “flu”: during the first week of starting LCHF some people experience aches and pains, headaches, lethargy, nausea, brain fog and/or irritability.
  2. Constipation
  3. Fatigue/lethargy
  4. Muscle aches/cramps
  5. Headaches
  6. Signs of low blood pressure, including heart palpitations, dizziness and nausea.

The good news is that the root cause of these symptoms is the same and completely rectifiable.

 

What’s behind the symptoms?

When you are eating a conventional high carbohydrate diet, your body is producing quite a lot of insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreatic beta cells in response to glucose or “sugar” entering the bloodstream after digestion of a carbohydrate-containing food or beverage. Insulin’s job is to remove “sugar” from the bloodstream and put it into the cells, where it’s turned into energy or stored. One of the side effects of insulin is to reduce the kidneys’ excretion of water and certain electrolytes or minerals (namely, sodium or ‘salt’, magnesium and potassium) [1-3].

Conversely, when you eat a low carbohydrate diet the amount of insulin that your pancreas produces is dramatically reduced, as there’s much less carbohydrate entering the blood stream from your diet. The lower insulin level results in increased excretion of water, sodium, magnesium and potassium from the kidneys.  This loss of fluid often lowers blood pressure and can cause dehydration if the fluid is not replaced by drinking more. The resulting symptoms can include headaches and symptoms of low blood pressure, including fatigue/lethargy, heart palpitations, dizziness and nausea. The loss of sodium, potassium and magnesium can cause muscle aches, pains and cramps, as well as irritability. [1]

 

How to fix it

  1. Drink plenty of fluids (to thirst)
  2. Add salt to your food
  3. Drink a cup of bone broth every day
  4. Take a magnesium supplement, which provides 400 mg of elemental magnesium daily. Choose a supplement that contains magnesium in the form of a magnesium chelate (elemental magnesium bound to an amino acid), such as magnesium glycinate, for optimal absorption.

 

Important note: Should drinking more fluids, consuming more salt, drinking bone broth and taking a magnesium supplement not improve your symptoms, it is important that you see your doctor as soon as possible.

 

References

  1. Volek JS and Phinney SD. The art and science of low carbohydrate living. 2011
  2. DeFronzo RA. The effect of insulin on renal sodium metabolism. A review with clinical implications. 1981 Sep;21(3):165-71.
  3. Quiñones-Galvan A, Ferrannini E. Renal effects of insulin in man. J Nephrol. 1997 Jul-Aug;10(4):188-91.

Inflammatory food

Excess inflammation leads to autoimmune, inflammatory and age-related diseases as well as aging, but changing the way you eat can help

By Tamzyn Murphy Campbell
BSc, BSc Med(Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics, RD

Excess inflammation leads to autoimmune, inflammatory and age-related diseases as well as aging, but changing the way you eat can help

By Tamzyn Murphy Campbell
BSc, BSc Med(Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics, RD

To most of us “inflammation” – characterised by redness, heat, pain and swelling – is a dreaded word associated with a variety of ailments: joint pain, backache, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis (skin condition). But inflammation actually has an essential role to play. It’s our body’s first form of attack against infection or other foreign bodies. The wellknown inflammation related problems set in when inflammation spirals out of control and starts to attack the body’s own tissues – autoimmune disease – or when it goes on too long – thought to be one of the processes responsible for aging and related diseases. So, although inflammation is an important indicator of something being wrong, keeping it in check and preventing it from going overboard is fundamental to health – and what you eat can help.

BEAT THE BELLY

Belly fat releases inflammatory molecules which scientists blame for obesity-associated inflammatory diseases: insulin resistance, diabetes and heart disease risk factors (high blood pressure and imbalanced blood fat and cholesterol levels). It’s also linked to lower levels of the hormone adiponectin, which may play a role in increased inflammation, heart disease risk and insulin resistance. Research indicates that women with a belly have more signs of inflammation than their male counterparts. Scientists have found that using diet to keep weight in check reduces inflammation and the markers of its associated diseases. So find a diet and exercise program that works for you, and stick to it to drop the kilos and keep inflammation free. Reducing stress and getting adequate sleep can also help keep the belly at bay.

INFLAMMATORY FOOD

Researchers have found that certain food promotes inflammation, while other food reduces it. Avoid the following to reduce inflammation:

  • Trans fats – found in processed baked goods (biscuits) and fast food fried in reused oil – raise inflammation-boosting molecules and heart disease risk
  • Refined carbohydrates and sugar increase inflammation, probably due to the combination of their low fibre, vitamin, mineral, phytonutrient and essential fatty acid content, as well as their penchant for swinging blood sugar and insulin levels. This boosts blood fat and free radicals, causing inflammatory molecule production, which in turn results in inflammation
  • Processed food is high in trans fats and refined carbohydrates and sugar. So they’re definitely a no-no
  • Excess omega-6 fats Most of us get too much inflammation-promoting omega-6 in our diet, from processed food and cooking oils, like sunflower oil. The omega-6 fat, linoleic acid (LA) is converted into arachidonic acid (AA), which is the major building block for making inflammation-promoting molecules (eicosanoids).

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY FOOD

This food helps reduce inflammation throughout the body and therefore also age-related inflammatory diseases (e.g. osteoarthritis) and the activation of aging genes

  • Unsaturated fats Monounsaturated fats from nuts, seeds, avocado, olive and canola oils improve your blood fat profile to reduce inflammatory molecules and heart disease risk
  • Omega-3 fats found in oily fish (Norwegian salmon, snoek, sardines, anchovies), activate anti-inflammation genes. They’re also a building block for the production of anti-inflammatory molecules. And higher levels of omega-3 fats inhibit the production of inflammatory molecules made from omega-6 fats. Eat fatty fish at least three times per week or supplement with fish, or krill oil
  • Moderate alcohol has been linked to lower blood levels of inflammation-promoting molecules and reduced heart disease risk. Wine (1-2 glasses daily) is particularly anti-inflammatory, but beer and liquor have also been found to be beneficial
  • Antioxidants found in fruit and vegetables (especially brightly coloured ones), certain herbs and spices (cloves, oregano, rosemary, tumeric), green and rooibos tea, dark chocolate and red wine reduce free radical damage and inflammatory molecule production
  • Fibre exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by helping control blood sugar, insulin, fat and cholesterol levels, increasing adiponectin levels and reducing inflammatory molecule production. Fibre’s found in vegetables, fruit, beans, lentils, nuts and seeds.

References include

  1. Chung HY, Lee EK, et al. Molecular Inflammation as an Underlying Mechanism of the Aging Process and Age-related Diseases. JDR. Jul 2011;90(7):830-40
  2. Pou KM, Massaro JM, et al. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes are cross-sectionally related to markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. The Framingham Heart Study. Circulation. 2007;116:1234-41
  3. Giugliano D, Ceriello A, et al. The effects of diet on inflammation. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2006;48(4):677-85
  4. Lihn AS, Pedersen SB, Richelsen B. Adiponectin: action, regulation and association to insulin sensitivity. Obes Rev. Feb 2005;6(1):13-21
  5. Tajik N, Keshavarz SA, et al. Effect of diet-induced weight loss on inflammatory cytokines in obese women. J Endocrinol Invest. Jun 2012: Published online
  6. Calder PC. n−3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids, inflammation, and inflammatory diseases. Am J Clin Nutr. Jun 2006;83(6):S1505-19
  7. ORAC Values. www.oracvalues.com. Jul 2012